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"A Voice" 
The Ada Doss Campbell Story

Mrs. Ada Doss Campbell was institutionalized at Lakeland Lunatic Asylum, now Central State Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky in 1935, and died there in 1940.  Her medical notes document her cause of her death as professional neglect.

 

Several agencies, groups and government officials have help to shine the light on this atrocity:  Kentucky Foundation for Women;  Metro Office for Women;  Metro Human Rights Commission; Kentucky State Legislators, Certificate of Adjournment, Rachel Platt of the Frazier Museum; Kentucky State University; Kentucky Foundation for Women; Highland Mother’s Club; Kentucky State University School of Social Work and the Kentucky State University Foundation. 

See interview with Frazier Museum interview with Rachel Platt: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1z_GKf9POs

See Kentucky Foundation for Women interview: 

https://www.kfw.org/feminist-blog/journeytotruth/

Portriat by: Lavernist Bryant, Jr.

 

Make tax deductible donation to the Ada Doss Campbell-Kentucky State University Scholarship:  

 

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THE KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY

MRS. ADA DOSS CAMPBELL MEMORIAL ENDOWMENT

SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

 

CASE STATEMENT

Intention of Endowment

The intention of the Mrs. Ada Doss Campbell Memorial Endowment Scholarship is to provide a perpetual scholarship for individuals who are pursuing a social work degree at Kentucky State University.  One student will be granted a scholarship for 4 years.

Ada Doss Campbell was born in 1897, and at that time she had no rights as a woman, no rights as an African American, and no rights as a person.  She died on May 31, 1940 at was then called the Lakeland Asylum, now known as Central State Hospital in Louisville.  The hospital documented that she died at the age of 43 of professional neglect in the early stages pneumonia.   

Ada Doss Campbell’s memory has been honored by the following: the Kentucky State Legislature; Kentucky Foundation for Women; Frazier Museum, Metro Louisville Office for Women; Metro Louisville Human Rights Commission; WHAS-11 Television and the Kentucky State University School of Social Work.

History

Dr. Renee Campbell has been giving a “a voice” to a woman she never met.  The woman is her grandmother, Ada Doss Campbell.

Dr. Campbell has spent her life as a voice for so many in social work, and now she is working to leave a legacy to impact those who are voiceless and those who want to attend her alma mater, Kentucky State University to receive a social work degree. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                         

                                                                                  Mrs. Ada Doss Campbell

Fund Development Endowment Goal:                                                                                                                      $132,000

SERVING THOSE ON THE FRONT LINES DURING COVID-19​

PGHF- COMPASSION AND LOVE DURING THE TIME OF A INTERNATIONAL PANDIMIC


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"Serving with Compassion and Love"

PGHF - DEDICATED TO HELPING THOSE WHO HAVE SUFFERED DISASTERS AND LOSSES.

PGHF responds to COVID-19 by donating homemade "Maltinaa Mask" to Frontline Workers -Medical Staff at Louisville East Nursing

Uplifting People

GIVING TO THE COMMUNITY AND THE WORLD

Through our Humanitarian efforts, we have the potential to make a real and positive change both nationally and internationally in the community. This is one of our key areas of focus here at Phoenix Global Humanitarian Foundation, and a source of much success for our Humanitarian Organization.

"Be Safe"

SUPPORTING OUR "FRONTLINE WORKERS"

Phoenix Global Humanitarian Foundation, “services with love and kindness, helping those who suffer from disasters and losses”  is donating homemade, one of a kind mask to those who are Essential Workers,who are on the “Frontline “ during the COVID PANDEMIC.  The “Maltinaa Mask” are handmade by Dr. Renee Campbell.


The first mask were delivered to to nurses on the 300 unit of  Louisville East Acute in Louisville, Kebntucky today.  These are two pictures of the nurses who are working on the front line, wearing their “Maltinaa Mask".  Phoenix Global Humanitarian Foundation "thanks you for your service".  ️️

Join us in making a real difference.
pghf2008@gmail.com

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Experience Phoenix Global Humanitarian Foundation

HOPE IS WHERE THE HEART IS

Phoenix Global Humanitarian Foundation wants to spread our message of serving those who suffer disasters, tragedies and losses locally and globally.  We want to uplift people to the awareness that each one has the power to give to their community and the world.  We believe that a single action can make a difference, and that collective action can greatly impact the world.

Continuing Humanitarian Work in Ghana

Hope - "The belief in a positive outcome related to events and circumstances in one's own life."
Your support is important to our work at Phoenix Global Humanitarian Foundation. There are many ways you can contribute towards our causes, and every little bit that you commit goes a long way in helping us fulfill our mission. Learn more about how you can get involved and take advantage of the opportunity to do some good.

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Volunteer Your Time

Want to join our efforts but not sure where to start? Volunteer Your Time and take advantage of this incredible opportunity to lend your support. It’s a great way to contribute to our cause, and every little bit counts towards paving the path for a better tomorrow. Get in touch with us today for more details about how you can help.

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"Hope"

The Hope Clothesline project is patterned after the 22 year old Louisville Clothesline Project.  Dr. Campbell is one of the founders of the "Clothesline Project" that provides sessions where women can express their own pain by painting words and imagery on tee shirts in a safe, secure and private environment. The shirts are then displayed on a clothesline as a public display of how widespread abuse is. The project alerts perpetrators that victims will not keep silent, and gives women who might not ordinarily have a voice to tell about the violence that has happened to them.


The women's Hope Clothesline Project became a reality when one day, during a hot summer in December 2007 in Tamale, Ghana, a group of fifty women spoke out about the devastating violence that had been done to them by someone who was supposed to love them. The women gathered in a dirt floor hut with wooden benches and a few wooden tables. They could not afford to buy the traditional tee shirts that are typically used during sessions. Instead they used a bolt of yellow felt material. They cut the material out in the shape of 50 tee shirts and fifty women shared a box of eight magic markers.

In a crowded hut women who could not write drew their feelings about the abuse they experienced. Women who could write wrote their feelings about the abuse they experienced. These women, for the first time in their lives, had a voice and could speak out about the cruelty they suffered and what was done to them by someone who was supposed to love and protect them. The shirts were hung out on a clothesline in front of the hut for all in the village to see. The women held hands with each other and screamed with joy about what they did that day. They chanted as they held hands. “We are strong and vibrant women with the innate capacity to heal.”

Dr. Campbell created a limited edition print of one of the women who was so brave and spoke out about her own abuse during the first Hope Clothesline Project in the small village in Tamale., Ghana-West Africa

Contact us today and start getting involved.